Posts Tagged ‘Musical Theatre’

Side Show: Perfection Squared—Theatre

June 23, 2014

The reimagined production of the musical, “Side Show,” currently playing at the Kennedy Center’s Eisenhower Theater, is as close to perfection as a play can come. A dramatic story beautifully sung and acted by every single cast member, “Side Show” is a stunning piece of work. This new production (in association with the La Jolla Playhouse), adds depth with fresh material to the 1997 Broadway musical, and is directed by Oscar-winner Bill Condon,with music by Henry Krieger, book and lyrics by Bill Russell and additional book material by Condon.photo (3)

“Side Show” is based on the real-life story of Daisy and Violet Hilton,conjoined twins born in early 20th century England. Abandoned by their mother at birth, they were put up for adoption and raised by a woman who put them on display, charging money to see them. When the twins were young, the woman married a circus side-show manager who made them the featured act in his show. He treated them horribly, considering the two to be his personal property. While on tour in the U.S., the girls finally gained the where-with-all to sue for their freedom and won their suit. They were now able to make their own choices. But would they really ever be free and just what would their future hold? In dramatically entertaining fashion, “Side Show” gives us the before and after story of that freedom.

“Side Show” takes on the freak aspect of the girls’ lives head on with a terrific opening number, “Come Look at the Freaks” (although these days, a tattooed woman is not all that freakish). We are introduced to each member of the show by circus owner, Sir (Robert Joy), with standout performances from each cast member.  We then meet the twins, Daisy and Violet (Emily Padgett and Erin Davie). The two look amazingly alike, but they have very different personalities. Daisy is an extrovert who likes fame and attention, while Violet is more introverted and wants a husband and home. But what they both desire more than anything else is to be treated, as they tell us in song, “Like Everyone Else.”

Daisy’s and Violet’s freak show existence is given a huge jolt in Texas when smooth-talking  talent agent, Terry (Ryan Silverman), and vocal and dance coach, Buddy (Matthew Hydzik), visit the show. Under their tutelage the twins grow more confident and when Terry encourages them to sue for their freedom and leave the show for the Orpheum Circuit, they do just that. It is a hard break because the circus cast has become their family. But with loyal friend, Jake (David St. Louis), leaving with them, the separation is made easier and their hopes are high as they begin their tour. But will they get the lives they imagined? Will they be happier? Who’s to say.

Emily Padgett and Erin Davie are equally fantastic. Their singing—either in unison or apart—is absolutely beautiful. Through their voices we really understand the highs and lows of the twins’ lives. How these two actresses manage to sing, dance and act so closely together every day is unimaginable. Theirs is a spectacular performance.

With the twins’ closing song of the first act, “Who Will Love Me As I Am,” you might think nothing could top that performance. Then the second act begins. Shortly thereafter Ryan Silverman’s Terry takes center stage, ruminating over his conflicting feelings for Daisy with a “A Private Conversation.” His voice fills the theatre in show-stopping theatre magic. Just when you’ve begun to recover emotionally and wonder if “Side Show” can possibly soar any higher, David St. Louis’ Jake comes forward to profess his love for one of the sisters in “You Should Be Loved.” It’s another heart-stopping moment of song.

In addition to the acting, singing and dancing, the costumes are also spectacular. The sisters wear gorgeous dresses throughout, and the costumes and makeup for the other characters are equally impressive.

“Side Show” is not a happy, go-lucky musical, but musical theatre in the very best sense of the words. It’s theatre you won’t soon forget.

“Side Show” runs through July 13.

4 nuggets out of 4

An Evening with Patti LuPone and Mandy Patinkin: That’s All You Need to Know—Theatre

February 24, 2014

Mandy, Mandy, Mandy…What are you doing on “Homeland?”As my heart raced and then melted after he finished singing Some Enchanted Evening, I couldn’t help but think this. And this was just after the fourth number.An Evening With Patti LuPone and Mandy Patinkin

An Evening with Patti LuPone and Mandy Patinkin” is everything you’d want from the two…but still you leave the theatre wanting to spend more time with them. The two have known each other since 1978 and it shows. It’s like they can read each other’s musical minds. With just a piano and bass for accompaniment, LuPone and Patinkin entertain for nearly two hours. And what entertainment it is.

As the program begins, the theatre is dark. Then the lights come up with the spotlight on the two, and they begin singing Stephen Sondheim’s Another Hundred People. Patti’s wearing some sort of black/navy jumpsuit with a scarf and Mandy’s dressed in similarly colored shirt and pants. It’s all quite casual and playful and simply wonderful.

It’s hard to get an intimate feel in the Kennedy Center’s Eisenhower Theatre, but somehow these two performers manage to pull it off. Conceived by Patinkin and Paul Ford, the program is sprinkled with remembrances of LuPone and Patinkin, with dialogue from musicals and just chit-chat between old friends and the audience. And often the chitchat turns into a beautiful number. While many of the songs are performed together, each gets a chance to shine in solos. LuPone brings the house down with “Gypsy’s” Everything’s Coming up Roses and Patinkin rips your heart with his rendition of “Passion’s” Loving You. When the two conclude “Carousel’s” If I Loved You, the silence from the audience is palpable. But the program is not all heartache and tears. They have a blast with Kander and Ebb’s Old Folks, and Patinkin goes off the rails in a great way with Sondheim’s The God-Why-Don’t-You-Love-Me Blues.

Tony-award winning choreographer Ann Reinking provides some interesting dance movements for the two using chairs or just their hands. It sounds simple, but it works and brings a bit more pizzazz to the whole production.An Evening with Patti LuPone and Mandy Patinkin 1

LuPone and Patinkin sing more than 30 songs and somehow it seems greedy to want more. But I do. And so I ask again…Mandy, Mandy, Mandy…paying the mortgage aside…what are you doing with “Homeland?” Could a musical episode please be in the works? Until that happens, be on the lookout for “An Evening with Patti LuPone and Mandy Patinkin” in your neck of the woods.

4 nuggets out of 4

If/Then: Maybe Not—Theatre

November 13, 2013

If/Then,” the new musical starring Idina Menzel, comes to DC’s National Theatre with high expectations for Broadway. Based on previews, those expectations might need to be tempered.ifthen2

Directed by Michael Greif, with book and lyrics by Brian Yorkey and music by Tom Kitt, “If/Then” is the story of 40-year-old Elizabeth, who has moved back to New York City following the breakup of her marriage. Her new life kicks into gear in a New York City park. But which life? And therein lays the tale.

“If/Then” is a form of the movie, “Sliding Doors.” If this path is taken, then this will happen. If the other path is taken, then that will happen. As the story first unfolds, it’s not readily apparent that two different stories are being told almost simultaneously. Once that is understood, you begin to relax and appreciate…or not…what is happening on stage.

There’s a reason Idina Menzel won a Tony for “Wicked.” She has a wonderfully powerful voice and that voice holds her in good stead as Elizabeth. She’s also a first-rate actress and the fact that you can feel and sense her emotions clear up in the balcony is testament to that. Unfortunately the score doesn’t provide enough great songs worthy of her voice. She has one clever number in the middle and a truly terrific number near the end of the play, but the rest of her songs are rather ho-hum.

I’m not certain why LaChanze was cast as Elizabeth’s friend, Kate. A  Tony award winner for “The Color Purple,” she really isn’t given much to do and her songs are not memorable. Anthony Rapp as Lucas is very good as Kate’s best friend from college. He, too, has a few songs, and while his voice is fine, is not anything you will remember once you leave the theatre. James Snyder is very convincing as Elizabeth’s love interest, Josh. At first his voice seems nice enough, but then he takes it to another level when he hits some high notes. His “My Kid” is a show-stopper.

The idea of showing us life’s “what if’s” is intriguing. The problem with “If/Then’s” execution is that we see not only Elizabeth’s two paths, but also fully developed stories for the two supporting characters in her life…in both paths. It adds a lot of time to the play and, frankly, her friends’ romantic stories aren’t very compelling and neither are their songs.

For a musical, there’s not a lot of musicality to “If/When.” The play is meant to be “real” which can explain the lack of dancing and the rather ordinariness of the songs.

Other than Menzel, the real stars of the show are the sets.  Mark Wendland’s designs are spectacular. The parks, the subway, the buildings…all are wonderfully imaginative.

Considering that “If/Then’s” creative crew– Brian Yorkey and Tom Kitt–are Tony winners for prior work, this play is disappointing. Overall, “If/When” underwhelms and in its present form, I don’t see how it settles in to a long Broadway run.

“If/Then” runs through December at the National Theatre.

2 nuggets out of 4

 


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